REES Theatre met the goal

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The Rees  Project Committee, the group behind the efforts to move towards the renovation and repurpose of the theater announced the 1.5MM goal to secure the $300,000 Regional Cities matching grant was met. The community has shown their continuing support, there were still donations being taken at the Marshall County Museum as of 4:00 Wednesday. 

The first stage milestone has been met, it took eight months to reach the goal which puts us closer to the start of the renovation and the anticipated goal of a grand reopening in 2020, which will be the Theater’s 80th Anniversary. Organizers hope to have all work completed by spring or summer 2020. Fundraising will continue through the end of 2018 and 2019 to raise the balance of 3.64 million which includes an Endowment fund. 

The committee would like to thank the community again for their continuing vision in what The REES Theatre can be again!

Organizers: Friday event for Rees raised about $150K

PLYMOUTH

Organizers behind the effort to save the Rees Theater have surpassed the $1 million mark in their quest to raise $1.5 million before the end of the month.

The timing is critical.

If the organizers raise the $1.5 million before Oct. 31, they will qualify for a matching $300,000 grant through the Regional Cities Iniative.

Friday’s “Puttin’ on the Rees” was a success, with 300 attending the sold-out event at Christo’s Banquet Center, 800 E. Lincoln Highway, according to Randy Danielson, a member of the committee trying to restore and repurpose the theater.

Along with dinner, attendees had a chance to bid on items during both a live and silent auction.

Former Plymouth resident Mark Neidig served as the evening’s emcee.

“(He) delighted the crowd as he sang three songs selected for the event,” Danielson said late Sunday. “Student members of the Plymouth High School speech, theatre and choir showcased what will be possible on The Bob Pickell Performing Arts Stage at The Rees.”

Late last week, organizers estimated Friday’s event would raise about $50,000 not including ticket sales. Instead it raised about $150,000, Danielson said. Tickets were $50 each.

Organizers received about $25,000 in new pledges for the Pickell stage and about $71,000 in new, open pledges.

The silent auction generated slightly more than $6,000 and the live auction raised nearly $13,000.

Chris and Pam Kurtis, owners of Christo’s, donated the use of the banquet hall and the food for “Puttin’ on the Rees,” Danielson previously said, meaning 100 percent of the proceeds went toward the theater’s survival.

The overall goal is to raise a total of $3.46 million to rehabilitate the theater. Of that amount, $600,000 will go into an endowment to support the theater’s continued operation, organizers previously said.

Organizers said they are optimistic they’ll reach the $1.5 million to qualify for the $300,000 grant. But they said they will be counting on small donations from the general public to reach the goal. Donations can be in cash, pledges or in-kind donations, such as construction work or other services, organizers previously said.

Donations can be made online through the Marshall County Community Foundation at www.marshallcountygives.org or, for project details and specific donor levels, visit www.reesproject.com, according to organizers.

Pledge forms are available at the Marshall County Community Foundation, Marshall County Historical Museum, Bowen Printing or by calling 574-286-2391, organizers previously said.

The goal, organizers have said, is to have all work completed by spring or early summer 2020 to coincide with the theater’s 80th anniversary.

>>Read full article

Plymouth's Rees Theatre needs money to save history

PLYMOUTH, Ind. --- A community treasure is coming back to life. Since the 1940s Plymouth's Rees Theatre has been a place where families shared memories and connected with others in the community.

In 2009, the Rees Theatre closed. Now the Rees Theatre Project Committee wants to reopen the theatre 11 years later in 2020.

They must raise the private funding match of $1.5 million by Halloween this year.

If they reach that goal, they will receive a matching grant of $300,000 from the regional cities initiative.

To donate to the Rees Theatre visit www.marshallcountygives.org.

>> View ABC57 Video

Oct. 31 deadline for Rees quickly approaching: Organizers seeking donations big, small to save historic movie house

(The list of items that will be on the block during the evening's live auction are at the end of the article.)

PLYMOUTH Organizers for a fundraising dinner and auctions – silent and live – in Plymouth on Friday said the event is sold out and hope it will raise close to $50,000 to save a downtown landmark.

Christo’s Banquet Center will be hosting the “Puttin’ on The REES” event Friday to benefit the Rees Theater, which will include a prime rib/salmon dinner, raffle and 50/50 drawing. A cash bar will be available and entertainment will be provided by Plymouth High School performing arts students.

Former Plymouth resident Mark Neidig will emcee the evening. There will be an after-party at Opie’s Deli, 114 N. Michigan St., once festivities at Christo’s wind down.

Randy Danielson and Brent Martin, both on the committee to save the theater, said Tuesday the group is closing in on 60 percent of its goal of raising $1.5 million before Oct. 31. If the group is successful, it will capture a $300,000 Regional Cities matching grant. The Oct. 31 date is misleading, however, Martin said, because organizers will have to finalize several things, such as completing various paperwork, in the days before the deadline.

All 280 tickets for Friday’s event have been sold. Each ticket was $50. Organizers said they believe the event will raise about $50,000, not including ticket sales.

Chris and Pam Kurtis, owners of Christo’s, are donating the use of the banquet hall and the food for “Puttin’ on the Rees,” Danielson said, meaning 100 percent of the proceeds will go toward the theater’s survival.

The overall goal is to raise a total of $3.46 million to rehabilitate and repurpose the theater. Of that amount, $600,000 will go into an endowment to support the theater’s continued operation, Martin said.

Both Danielson and Martin said they are optimistic they’ll reach the $1.5 million to qualify for the $300,000 grant. But they said organizers will be counting on small donations from the general public to reach the goal. Donations can be in cash, pledges or in-kind donations, such as construction work, organizers previously said.

Donations can be made on-line through the Marshall County Community Foundation at www.marshallcountygives.org or, for project details and specific donor levels, visit www.reesproject.com, according to organizers. Pledge forms are available at the Marshall County Community Foundation, Marshall County Historical Museum, Bowen Printing or by calling 574-286-2391, organizers said.

Proceeds from the live auction will also be critical.

“We’re sitting on around $900,000,” said Martin, who is also serving as the project’s architect. “That’s a hell of a thing to accomplish with a 10,000 population in the community. I just feel that way. Even what we’ve got today is fantastic. But what we need is $1.5 million.

“To say I’m optimistic?” he continued. “Maybe I’m hopeful that we’re going to reach that goal – and those 280 people at the gala on Friday, you just better get your wallets out!”

Habitat Restore is removing the unsalvageable chairs to be broken down and recycled. This fall and winter, workers will remove the plaster ceiling. No asbestos was discovered in the plaster, Danielson said.

At the same time, the entire auditorium will be stripped down to the brick walls.

In the spring, organizers will again offer a memory tour so the public can see the bare-bones structure.

“With the film screen removed, that will expose the stage area,” Danielson said. “And we think (the evening of the tours) we’ll have some performances take place in there. It will be (standing-room only) performances – which are done a lot these days – just to give people an idea of what can and will occur there.”

Martin said South Bend-based Keller Structural Engineering is currently evaluating the east wall, the eastern portion of the north wall and the alley wall because there are “settlement issues” and possible issues with the foundation. The firm will also do some masonry work.

Once that is completed, Martin said, a new roof will be placed on the building. After that, work will move to the building’s interior.

The goal, both men said, is to have all work completed by spring or early summer 2020 to coincide with the theater’s 80th anniversary.

“Whether or not we meet that Oct. 31 goal, this project is going forward,” Martin said. “It’s going to happen, but it’s going to be a hell of lot easier with that $300,000.”

Bidder, bidder!

From a “Woodstock” film poster to a tour of the Marshall County Courthouse’s bell tower, many unique items will be up for grabs during the live auction portion of the “Puttin’ On the Rees” event Friday evening:

– Commemorative Woodstock ticket, framed “Woodstock” film poster, tie-dyed shirt and CBD oil valued at $900 from Wellness 101 and Nelson Chipman;

– Chicago Cub urn valued at $700 from The Remembrance Center;

– Michiana Hot Air Balloon Ride and $20 Plymouth Chamber of Commerce bucks valued at $450 from Kathy Bottorff;

-- A tour for six of the Marshall County Courthouse’s bell tower as well as a picnic on the courthouse lawn valued at $600 from Curt Palmer;

– A wine tour of Michigan valued at $800 from Hoosier Food Services and Mary Beth Listenberger;

– A tour for eight of the tunnels under the Poor Handmaids of Jesus Christ convent valued at $350 from PHJC and Sister Judith;

– A stay at a bed and breakfast in Stevensville, Mich., valued at $600 from Dan Kunde;

– Two Rees medallion reproductions valued at $2,500 from Lane Lafoon;

– A prime rib dinner for 12 valued at $500 from Hoosier Food Services and Mary Beth Listenberger;

– Dinner for six valued at $600 from Dan Marohn;

– An Elvis Presley poster valued at $750 from Denny Bottorff;

– An 11-by-14 quilling of the Rees’ marquee valued at $500 from Anna Kietzman;

– A one-week stay in Steamboat Springs, Colo., valued at $2,500 from Ellen Skinner;

-- An advertising package valued at $975 from radio stations WKVI/WYMR;

-- Two tickets to Garth Brooks’ concert at the University of Notre Dame valued at $250 from Ellen Skinner.

>>Read full article - Plymouth Pilot

REES Theatre Project Needs Your Donation Now

This summer, The REES Theatre Project was added to the Marshall County Crossroads Stellar Initiative, as another show of community support. When complete, the art deco restored interior will create a multi-use venue for the performing arts, educational programing and the celebration of life events. Dependent on successful fundraising efforts, the facility is expected to open in its 80th Anniversary year 2020.

The REES Theatre has a notable historic past. Original construction of the theater began in 1939 within a massive three-story red brick building originally completed in 1865 as Plymouth’s tallest edifice on lot No. 1 of the 1836 plat map. Well-known architect Alves O’Keefe designed the theater which was completed in February of 1940 by then owners Stewart and Opal Rees who resided on the third floor. It boosted the first ‘Mother’s Viewing Room’ for fussy babies.

In the spring of 2017 phase one work began to restore the art deco glazed block façade and repairs were made to the marquee which was completely rebuilt in a redevelopment project in 1997. With neon repairs complete and all new LED energy efficient bulbs in place, the lighted marquee was returned to the Plymouth streetscape by the fall of 2017. The marquee displays community and private messages that change on a daily basis.

With a sustainable business plan in place to create a multipurpose event center focused on the presentation of film, the performing arts, education and the celebration of life events, a capital campaign was established—Pledging to Save The REES. After witnessing the theater’s physical demise, the Plymouth community understands the need for renovation and sees the REES as a vital part of the city’s landscape once again.

In partnership with the Marshall County Community Foundation, pledges may be secured over a four-year payment period. In addition, an Endowment Fund has been established to secure and sustain The REES for the enjoyment of future generations.

Plymouth Mayor Mark Senter has given his support to the project, adding, “In 2020 the REES Theatre will turn 80 years old. In the past two years, a civic committee has brought forward an awesome idea to save the REES. Imagine the possibilities of a new downtown event venue for up-and-coming singers or new bands in the area, your daughter’s wedding and reception at a beautiful new site in downtown Plymouth, the Maxinkuckee Players performing on-stage an established Broadway musical, or watching the original Star Wars like you did in 1977 at the age of 11. Anything is possible at the REES.”

>>Read full article - WTCA News

REES Theatre Capital Campaign Accepts Donation from Hoosier Racing Tire

Regional Cities Initiative project to raise $1.5MM in philanthropic matching funds.

Plymouth, IN (September 28, 2018) – A local industry with international recognition has lent its support in saving an iconic downtown theatre in rural America. On Friday, September 28th, Hoosier Racing Tire President, John DeSalle, was on hand to announce the company’s investment of $50,000 to the REES Theatre Project. The Plymouth manufacturer is matching a gift made by the Plymouth Industrial Development Corporation (PIDCO) earlier this summer. Both organizations donated at the leadership matching gift level which will provide significant capital investment to the project. 

These investments by local businesses and organizations comes at an ideal time. The REES Theatre Project is striving to meet an October 31st deadline for a Regional Cities Initiative matching grant of $300,000. This is a wonderful opportunity to support a worthwhile quality-of-place enhancing project and capture the Regional Cities matching funds. Successful fundraising this year will allow interior renovations to begin quickly and a grand reopening to take place as early as the first quarter of 2020. 

Since the closing of the iconic REES Theatre in 2009 after a 69-year run, the community of Plymouth has been imagining the possibilities for its return to the vigor of its grand opening night on April 12, 1940 featuring Gone with the Wind. Then in December of 2016, a Plymouth couple, encouraged by the presentation of 8th grade students from Lincoln Junior High and the many placemaking efforts occurring in the downtown area, decided it was time to take some action. Their $100,000 gift to the Wythougan Valley Preservation Council allowed for the theater to be purchased from private owners and placed in a 501(c)3 not-for-profit now known as The REES Theatre Inc.   

Led by an original committee of twelve or the ‘Dirty Dozen’, this restoration effort has been supported by The City of Plymouth, Discover Plymouth, Plymouth Redevelopment Commission, Marshall County Economic Development Corporation, PEDC, PIDCO, Plymouth Chamber, M.C. Tourism Bureau, Marshall County Crossroads Museum & Historical Society, and the Marshall County Community Foundation. Endorsements have come from St. Joseph Regional Medical Center; LifePlex; Ancilla College; Culver Academies; and Plymouth, Triton, LaVille, and John Glenn Community Schools. 

The REES has a notable historic past. Original construction of the theater began in 1939 within a massive three-story red brick building originally completed in 1865 as Plymouth’s tallest edifice on lot No. 1 of the 1836 plat map. Well known architect Alves O’Keefe designed the theater which was completed in February of 1940 by then owners Stewart and Opal Rees who resided on the third floor. It boosted the first ‘Mother’s Viewing Room’ for fussy babies.

In the spring of 2017 phase one work began to restore the art deco glazed block façade and repairs were made to the marquee which was completely rebuilt in a redevelopment project in 1997. With neon repairs complete and all new LED energy efficient bulbs in place, the lighted marquee was returned to the Plymouth streetscape by the fall of 2017. The marquee displays community and private messages that change on a daily basis. 

With a sustainable business plan in place to create a multipurpose event center focused on the presentation of film, the performing arts, education and the celebration of life events, a capital campaign was established—Pledging to Save The REES. After witnessing the theater’s physical demise, the Plymouth community understands the need for renovation and sees the REES as a vital part of the city’s landscape once again.

In partnership with the Marshall County Community Foundation, pledges may be secured over a four-year payment period. In addition, an Endowment Fund has been established to secure and sustain The REES for the enjoyment of future generations.

Plymouth Mayor Mark Senter has given his support to the project, adding, “In 2020 the REES Theatre will turn 80 years old. In the last two years, a civic committee has brought forward an awesome idea to save the REES. Imagine the possibilities of a new downtown event venue for up and coming singers or new bands in the area, your daughter’s wedding and reception at a beautiful new site in downtown Plymouth, the Maxinkuckee Players performing on-stage an established Broadway musical, or watching the original Star Wars like you did in 1977 at the age of 11. Anything is possible at the REES.”

This summer, The REES Project was added to the Marshall County Crossroads Stellar Initiative, as another show of community support. When complete, the art deco restored interior will create a multi-use venue for the performing arts, educational programing and the celebration of life events. Dependent on successful fundraising efforts the facility is expected to open in its 80th Anniversary year 2020.

Landmark Plymouth theatre a step closer to opening its doors

A piece of history is coming back to life in downtown Plymouth.

The Rees Theatre closed back in 2009, but is currently under renovations to reopen its doors.

WSBT 22 found out that we could see the theatre opening within the next two years.

That's the goal, and today the theatre got another big check. This will go toward the $1.5 million dollars the Rees Theatre Project is trying to raise before October 31st.

If they meet this number, they will receive a matching grant of $300,000 from the Regional Cities Initiative.

The Rees Theatre sits vacant on a corner in downtown Plymouth, but soon that will change.

“We are really looking forward to the renovation and making it a keynote place in our downtown Plymouth,” said Randy Danielson, Rees Project co-chairman.

The building closed nearly a decade ago, but community members want to see it come back to life.

With grants and donations, the non-profit that runs the Rees Theatre started renovations last year –adding a new facade and marquee.

“The next project is actually securing the building,” said Danielson. “We have some masonry work that needs to be done so a stabilizing of the foundation.”

Then they will prepare for the interior renovations happening over the winter.

They plan on turning the space into a multifaceted theatre with a live performance stage and dinner theatre.

For many, this space is more than just a downtown attraction.

“As our children grew up we brought them to see all the cool movies like “Back to the Future” and “’Star Wars” and all those fun things, so this place has wonderful memories,” said Linda Starr, Rees Project board member.

Starr says opening the theatre back up will have a lasting effect on the community.

“For me it’s just a great thing to be able to be a part of making it go into the next generation and take on new life.”

Hoosier Racing Tire President John DeSalle announced a $50,000 investment to the project. Something the mayor of Plymouth says will jumpstart the next phase of renovations.

“To see people not only volunteering but opening up their wallets and giving to the cause of the Rees Theatre is very important, and we hope to get that done,” said Mark Senter, Plymouth mayor.

Successful fundraising this year will allow interior renovations to begin quickly.

The board is hoping to have a grand reopening in 2020, which is the theatre's 80th anniversary.

>> View WSBT22 Video

REES stage will honor Plymouth eduator

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With the gathering of PHS Alumni in River Park Square for the Mayor’s Month of Music series, it just seemed appropriate to make the announcement that the new performance stage at The REES will be named in honor of an educator who dedicated his entire teaching career to the students of the Plymouth Community School Corporation.  At the completion of the REES Project it will be known as The Bob Pickell Performing Arts Stage.  The announcement was made by PHS alums, Jack Davis ’65, project co-chairs, Donna Pontius ’69, Randy Danielson ’72 and other members of The REES Project Committee.

“Bob loved all types of music, but he would have especially enjoyed the ‘60’s and ‘70’s performance of the band Magic Buswhile wearing his tie-dyed tee shirt.” stated Danielson. 

Bob retired at the end of the 2015/16 school year after a 38 year career.  He stated in a retirement story, that his reason for going into education was fueled by his love for music and working with young people.  His first 27 years was in secondary music and the remaining 11 years at the elementary level.  If not a presence, he offered support to every school in the district.  This announcement to preserve the legacy of Bob’s impact on so many students through the years, comes with the endorsement of the Plymouth Community School Corporation.

This would have been Bob’s 45th reunion year with Yorktown High School’s Class of 1973.  He continued his education in music at Ball State University where he was a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity.

His sudden passing just weeks into his retirement left his family, former students, fellow educators and community heart-broken and knowing he had so much yet to offer even his church and community.  But, he indeed left his mark.  Jane Faulstich, a PHS theater teacher and member of the REES Project Committee had this to share; “Mr. Pickell left a lasting impression on so many of us. I have so many great memories of being in his classroom.  We sang, we danced, we laughed, and had so much fun.  When I found out that The REES Stage was being named in honor of Bob, I was overjoyed!  He loved performances of any kind!  He will watch over The REES and be continuously entertained by everything it will bring to our community.”

Bob’s wife, Chris, was endeared and excited with the news and called it a tremendous honor in his name and how he would have been right in there today making sure this effort becomes a reality.  She stated on behalf of herself and their two sons, Ryan and Jason: “We continue to be so grateful for the love and support given by the Plymouth community.”

A donor designation fund for The Bob Pickell Performing Arts Stage – The REES Project, has been set up in partnership with the Marshall County Community Foundation, 2701 N. Michigan St., Plymouth, IN  46563 or visiting www.reesproject.com 

PIDCO pledges $50K to REES Project

At its July Board meeting, voting members unanimously identified The REES Theatre Project as a catalyst for redevelopment in the downtown and a critical component in continuing to attract residential growth that will support business and industry.   It was agreed to invest a total of $50,000. into The REES Project over a period of four years.  This capital investment into the downtown business district will further support ongoing efforts of economic development in and around Plymouth.  “The sole purpose of this corporation has always been; to drive economic development through investment and that mission continues today.” stated current Board President Mike Miley.  “PIDCO has evolved over the course of time and continues in its quest to secure industrial growth in association with the Marshall County Economic Development Corporation along with a focus on the retail sector.”

Co-chair of The REES Project, Randy Danielson and his wife Eleanor attended the meeting and Danielson stated; “We were extremely pleased with the Boards level of financial support and commitment in joining the City of Plymouth and many others who are striving to meet the October 31st Regional Cities deadline to capture a $300,000. matching grant.”

Sixty-one years ago the Plymouth Industrial Development Corporation – PIDCO, was established on July 9th 1957 and began selling 6,000 shares of common stock to raise capital for the purpose of making Plymouth more attractive and desirable for new industrial, business and housing development to advance the economy of Plymouth and the surrounding area.

The founding of PIDCO was described in an article published in the January 22, 1980 edition of the Chicago Tribune that described two brothers; Walter and Charles Glaub as two florid, friendly gentleman who run the G & G Supermarket.  Walter described how in the mid 50’s a Michigan based company tried to set up a factory in Plymouth but they didn’t want to buy a building, so they didn’t come.  That very loss led to PIDCO.   The initial sale of stock in 1957 led to the selling of 3,200 shares at $50.00 a share to 290 residents.

“This gave us $116,000.” Glaub said. “With this money we started talking to another Michigan company, the Young Door Co.  We said. ‘What if we built your plant, didn’t charge you a down payment, sold it to you on a 15 year deal?’  They accepted.”  The company operated by two brothers, Bill and Robert, moved in 1959 into a 32,000 square foot building at the north end of Western Avenue.  The corporate headquarters were moved to Plymouth and it evolved into a 120,000 square foot building currently occupied and further expanded by American Containers Corporation operated by the Isban Family.

Bill and Mary Young former co-owners of the Young Door Co. provided Plymouth a gift in The Young Amphitheater.  Successors to that location Leonard and JoAnn Isban established and continue to support the successes of the Boys & Girls Club of Marshall County.  This is only one example of how Plymouth benefited from the existence of the Plymouth Economic Development Corporation.  We should be ever grateful to the following eleven founding members and their personal contributions to the Plymouth community and how they were identified in 1957…

  • Max Ball – Owner and operator of Ball Motor Sales.  Past City Councilman and active participant in civic affairs.
  • Ernest Bixel – Mayor of Plymouth, Indiana.  Co-owner of Don’s Sporting Goods, and Democrat County Chairman.
  • Rosetta Casbon – Owner and operator of local Coca-Cola plant in Plymouth, Indiana.  A capable business woman, mother and housewife.
  • Walter Glaub – Co-Owner of G & G Supermarket.  Experienced civic servant and member of Plymouth Plan Commission and Board of Zoning Appeals.
  • Charles Howard – Owner and operator of feed and seed company in Plymouth.  Active in school and civic projects, with wide and diversified business and civic experience, both in our community and other communities.
  • Dr. James Kubley – A medical doctor in general practice in the community.  Former President of Marshall County Medical Association and active in medical, hospital, and civic affairs of the community.
  • Andrew Metheny – Active in Farm Bureau and Insurance businesses.  Wide experience and background in community agricultural affairs.
  • N.B. Pete Merriman – Owner and operator of Merriman’s Grocery (now NaRie’s next to The REES) and Farm Operations Business, farm and real estate experience in our community.
  • Lee O’Connell – Owner and operator of Plymouth Building and former owner of the Ross Hotel.  Former President Plymouth Chamber of Commerce, Inc. with extensive civic service, particularly in industrial affairs of the community.
  • Dr. L. W. Vore – Medical Doctor in general practice of Medicine.  Former County Coroner and County Health Officer.
  • Deane Walker – Public relations officer of the State Exchange Bank.  Former State and Marshall County Superintendent of Schools, wide experience and holder of many positions in State and County government.

As described, they were not commonly industrialists but rather merchants and professionals who were concerned with the economic status of Plymouth and took an active role in bringing about change for future generations.  PIDCO is a living testament of a true legacy.

Regional Cities Extension Granted

MORE LEADERSHIP GIFTS FOR THE REES RECEIVED IN PAST WEEK

“Encouragement for the REE Theatre Committee came this past week following the announcement of the Stillson Family gift that will continue to move this effort forward,” stated Rees co-chair Randy Danielson.  Danielson’s statement follows the receipt of news that the Regional Cities Board has agreed to a requested extension date of October 31st.  

The extension request was made following the extreme flooding in Plymouth that diminished efforts to raise the funds needed to receive a grant in the amount of $300,000.  “If the REES is to return, individuals, businesses and industry alike, need to become involved throughout all of Marshall County.  This is no great amount of time to yet capture nearly one million dollars in the form of in-kind gifts of services and/or materials, cash donations, pledges or even a tax exempt retirement fund gift now that the REES Theatre Inc. has received its 501(c)3 status.” 

Danielson continued, “We have received an enormous amount of verbal support for this project.  Now is the time for this to translate into dollars and cents.  All levels of giving are appreciated.” 

It was pointed out that donations may be done on-line through the Marshall County Community Foundation at:www.marshallcountygives.org or, for project details and specific donor levels, visit: www.reesproject.com.  Pledge forms are available at the Marshall County Community Foundation, Marshall County Historical Museum, Bowen Printing or by calling 574-286-2391.

Also this past week, Star Level leadership gifts were acknowledged from:  The Oliver Ford Family, Dave and Chris Morrow/Morrow Insurance Agency and First Federal Savings Bank.  Other levels of support were also received from Plymouth WalMart & Associates and Jim Masterson/Masterson & Associates.

A number of upcoming fundraising events are planned which include:

  • August 23rd The Coffee Lodge & Bakery will sponsor a Supportin’ & Pullin’ for the REES, BBQ pulled pork sandwich lunch to dinner event at the Lodge with carry out and limited delivery available. 
  • The REES will be highlighted in this year’s Blueberry Festival Parade and will be a featured stop in the Marshall County Museum’s history walk in September. 
  • Christo’s Banquet Center will be hosting the Puttin’ on The REES event on October 5th which includes a Prime Rib/Salmon dinner, live & silent auctions, raffle and 50/50 drawing.  A cash bar will be available and featured entertainment will be provided by PHS performing arts students. 

Tickets will be going on sale next week for Supportin’ & Pullin’ for the REES at The Coffee Lodge and Bowen Printing as well as any committee member.  Watch the REES marquee and playbills for more information and dates.